Emily

Announcing… the Explore Veg Mentor Program!

Are you thinking of stepping into plant-based eating? Or are you already plant-based and want to provide support to someone looking to make a similar change?

Look no further, because CAA just launched a brand new program geared toward supporting veg and veg-curious individuals on their plant-based journey. Meet the Explore Veg Mentor Program!

The Explore Veg Mentor Program was designed to help individuals reach their plant-based goals, whether it be adding a few more veg meals into their week or going full-on veg. We all know it’s easier to reach your goal with someone rooting for you in your corner!

How does it work?

We pair mentees looking to make a plant-based change in their life with a mentor who has already gone through the process of learning about and living the lifestyle choices they’re contemplating.

Each pairing lasts three months, during which time the mentor and mentee team aim to be in touch with each other at least every two weeks and participate in at least one CAA event (this could be a potluck, dine-out, or another event). We encourage teams to do things such as share recipes, eat together, go grocery shopping together, and share blogs, videos, or books with each other.

Get involved!

For more information on the Explore Veg Mentor Program, visit our program page. To start your application, we’ll ask you to fill out a brief questionnaire and will be in touch with you about further steps within two weeks. We’re currently accepting applications for mentors and mentees.

You can also attend our January Potluck: Starting Out Plant-Based, where we’ll share tasty vegan food and meet volunteer program coordinators Yunuén Ávila and Sanchez Brown on Saturday, January 12 from 12:00pm – 1:30pm.

Volunteer Shoutout: Thank You 2018 Volunteers!

You make our work possible and the impact shows––this year, Minneapolis was named Veg News’ City of the Year, over nine plant-based restaurants opened around the Twin Cities metro and two more went vegan, and we welcomed a record number of attendees to Twin Cities Veg Fest (just to name a few). This huge progress confirms that more and more people are learning about the horrors animals are subjected to in the agriculture industry and are hungry for compassionate alternatives.

If you’ve been following us on social media this season, you may have seen some CAA stories shared by volunteers and community members. In the case that you haven’t (or if you’d like to see them again!) we compiled a number of stories shared with us this season. We loved reading about how these individuals have connected with work they’re passionate about, been impacted by the Twin Cities community, and how in turn we have been impacted by you! 

Thank you for sharing your passion and dedication to the animals this year.

Wrapped Up in Wrapping Paper

Written by Maya Ulrich

The holiday season has arrived, and with it comes a flourish of shopping for our loved ones. With so many options available at our fingertips, many of us find ourselves faced with ethical and economic dilemmas in regards to how we are going to spend our consumer dollars. 

Living a sustainable lifestyle does not have to be drab, hurt your wallet, or harm our animal friends. In fact, many of the ways that we can live a plant-based lifestyle extend beyond what we put on our plates. One of the biggest ways that we can remain environmentally and animal-friendly during these winter months is by knowing that most store-bought wrapping papers, ribbons, and foils are not, and I emphasize, NOT recyclable.

Discarded wrapping paper leaves a sea of shiny paper in our oceans and tumbling tissue paper in our backyards. To help avoid adding our waste to growing landfills (waste that ends up invading the habitats of our furry, scaled, and feathered friends and negatively affecting their health), we put together a list of alternative ways to wrap your gifts that are cruelty-free and help us protect the animals and our earth.

DO TRY:

1. Use reusable bags!

Not only are usable bags a gift in themselves, but they’re also extremely practical because they can be repurposed for other uses. The recipient of your gift will be able to tote around theirs with pride knowing that they are living sustainably. Heck, treat yourself at the same time and get one with a cute animal on it!

2. Use leftover paper from the Sunday comics

Your friends and family will get to see just how serious you are about cruelty-free living when they see The Peanuts covering their gifts. You get to laugh because you get to keep the green paper in your pocket instead of on their presents. They get to laugh because you are literally giving them a humorous gift.

3. Use pillowcases and sheets

Is using a pillowcase as wrapping paper glamorous? No. But everyone will be so impressed by your ingenuity and creativity that they won’t think twice about how it looks.

4. Use those boxes you get from shipping

Cardboard boxes just get thrown in the recycling anyway, why not customize the box for the person you are giving the gift to? Paint, stamp, and draw to your heart’s delight! The possibilities are endless.

5. Use old fabric or clothes

Similar to using a sheet or pillowcase. However, if you are super crafty and know how to work some scissors, a needle, and thread you can stitch together some cute DIY coverings.

6. Brown bag it!

Julie Andrews was onto something when she sang about “brown paper packages tied up with string,” and so can you! There’s something nostalgic about simple wrapping paper––try cutting up a leftover paper bag or using a roll of plain craft paper to decorate your gift.

7. Plain wrapping paper

If it’s free of metallic designs and glitter, it’s likely recyclable! Make sure to double check the…erm, wrapping 🙂

 

AVOID: 

1. Animal-based products for your wrappings.

Animal-based wrappings including beeswax, fur, and leather aren’t cruelty-free.

2. Bows, glitter, and ribbon.

While many add a beautiful and sparkly flair to a gift, these are not recyclable! Many bows that are plastic-paper composite are not the right composition to make cardboard, which makes them a direct-to-trash item unless you decide to reuse the bow again and again. Tricky!

Volunteer Shoutout: Meet Shannon!

Shannon Kimball has been the Program Coordinator of Bridges of Respect since 2005. He became involved with CAA around the time he met Freeman Wicklund, former Program Coordinator of Bridges of Respect, when Freeman came into his store to print and laminate some posters for the program in 1998. Shannon became involved with CAA’s outreach and the Bridges Program gradually, before becoming a Humane Educator in 2003.

“Once I took over as coordinator [in 2005], I could see that I needed to learn all of the presentations and I started to develop a few that we didn’t have,” said Shannon of the transition, which included a focus on growing the program further and reworking some existing presentations. Their focus was on narrowing the presentations down to a strong core of topics that would be sustained by a growing team of volunteers.

Bridges of Respect provides free humane education presentations to schools and community groups of all ages in the Twin Cities metro area. The current Humane Education Team includes Christine Coughlin, Kathy Coughlin, Freeman Wicklund, and Shannon Kimball. The team brought 38 presentations to over 1100 students in 2018, presenting six out of their seven presentation topics. Circle of Compassion, Our Food Our World, Beyond Violence, and Animals in Entertainment were the most popular presentations in 2018.

Thinking Critically

The presentations encourage students to critically think about the use of animals in our society and honoring humanity’s values of compassion, responsibility, mercy, and empathy. Shannon has presented to students from middle school to college and tailors each presentation to the group’s age, curriculum, and amount of time available for the presentation.

“I want to leave people with a sense of urgency without destroying their outlook on the whole world,” said Shannon with a little laugh. “I get kinda tired sometimes of being the bearer of bad news. I can see the looks in some kids faces––no matter what age group I’m with––when they start to get a grasp on the realities of how bad it is out there and that we really do need their help.”

Mike Bieniek, a Bridges of Respect volunteer poses by the Blaine High School sign before three classes that morning.

Each presentation Shannon gives ends with a brief overview of plant-based nutrition along with ways to eat more plant-based if the students are interested in giving it a try. This information is typically something students will not receive in class, and if they do, it’s usually a very brief overview. After each presentation, Shannon shares additional resources with students. “We want to be accessible for students who may have further questions and we want to be approachable.”

Shannon makes sure that each presentation ends on a positive note, reminding students that their decisions can make a difference. “I want to make sure that students are empowered and leave happy.”

“We always come back to ethics and compassion as our main message, but we also include health and environmental issues.” Shannon has presented for several health classes and shifts the message to more of a dietary focus. While he’s comfortable answering many of the standard vegan questions like, “Where do you get your protein?” he looks at being asked new questions as an opportunity to learn more and makes sure to have a number of additional resources discussing topics like maintaining a plant-based diet while gluten-free, soy-free, or diabetic. “The best resource I can recommend for these questions is veganhealth.org––there are a number of physicians that are in a better position to answer these questions than I am.”

 

For a presentation at the School of Environmental Studies, students watched the documentary Cowspiracy, learned about veganic agriculture, and looked at how living lower on the food chain can be the most sustainable for us all.

A Tasty Message

The end of each presentation also includes another favorite: samples of vegan meats, cheeses, and milk. In 2018, Bridges gave shared over one thousand food samples, reaching 570 students. Food samples really help show how easy (and how delicious!) plant-based eating can be.

One of the questions he frequently gets in classes is ‘What about conscientious omnivorey? If we’re nice to animals, isn’t that good enough?’ To which Shannon answers, “Any action is commendable if we’re trying to reduce suffering for animals but it’s more of a milestone than an endpoint. The vegan community has built more infrastructure than conscientious omnivores. What I mean is that if I hop on a plane and ask for a vegetarian or vegan meal, chances are they’ll know what I mean whereas if I said I was a conscientious omnivore they wouldn’t know what I was talking about and that’s because groups like Compassionate Action for Animals have been there building structure and community that makes it easier for people to move in the plant-based direction.”

For more information or to schedule a free presentation for your students or organization, please email info@bridgesofrespect.org. You can also support Bridges of Respect’s outreach and longevity by making a donation to our year-end campaign.

Why Give this December?

1. Giving supports lasting change for the animals.

A gift to Compassionate Action for Animals continues to support CAA’s approach to change for farmed animals through our focused programs:

  • Increasing Awareness with our Wholesome Minnesota, Bridges of Respect, and ExploreVeg Mentorship Programs
  • Building Community through our dine-outs, potlucks, documentary screenings, farm sanctuary visits, and Twin Cities Veg Fest
  • Nurturing Advocates through leafleting, Pay-Per-View, and more
  • Ultimately, Making Change!

 

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Photos from the 16th Annual Vegan Thanksgiving

Thanks to all who attended our 16th Annual Vegan Thanksgiving this past Saturday at Matthews Park! After selling out all of our (free) tickets for the event, we plan to look for larger spaces for future Thanksgiving potlucks to invite everyone in our growing community.

Each year, our annual Vegan Thanksgiving Potluck gives us a chance to come together as a community and celebrate plant-based, holiday food. For some of us, this is our one opportunity during the holidays for an entirely plant-based celebration and for others, this is one of many. We are grateful for this yearly opportunity to celebrate with our plant-based family––YOU!

Thank you to The Herbivorous Butcher for donating their delicious vegan stuffed turkeys for the event! We’d also like to thank the University of Minnesota for their support with this event.

This event would not be what it is without volunteers––many thanks to those who volunteered event last Saturday. Special thanks to our Thanksgiving Planning Committee, Henry Patterson, Rae Hermeier, and Taylor Borgman, for their time and dedication in planning, advertising, and hosting this year’s potluck!

If you attended the event, we invite you to fill out this brief survey to let us know about your experience! Your feedback helps us to continue to improve our events.

Big thanks to Nathan Gaut for photographing this event!

Who is Dr. Milton Mills?

Dr. Milton Mills is coming to the Twin Cities to speak at the Cut the Cheese event at French Meadow on December 6. Learn more about his extensive career in plant-based nutrition, dairy-free advocacy, and more here!

 

A Medical Career

Dr. Milton Mills is a graduate of Stanford University School of Medicine.

Milton transitioned to a plant-based diet when he was a teenager and noticed physical benefits almost immediately.

He is the Associate Director of Preventive Medicine with the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM).

Throughout his career, he has published several research journal articles dealing with racial bias in federal nutrition policy and co-authored PCRM’s report on Racial and Ethnic Bias in the U.S. Dietary Guidelines.

He serves as the Race & Nutrition Specialist and Board Adviser for A Well-Fed World.

He trained as an internal medicine physician and now works as an intensive care unit doctor in Washington D.C. and Fairfax Hospital in Virginia.

 

An Advocate for Plant-Based Eating

Dr. Milton Mills was interviewed by Marla Rose, Vegan Feminist Agitator.

He was featured on What the Health, a documentary from Kip Andersen and Keegan Kuhn, the same directors of Cowspiracy: The Sustainability Secret.

Today he shares his perspective on the effects of eating animal products as well as a variety of other topics including what the Bible says about Veganism, Are Humans Designed to Eat Meat? and more.

He was interviewed by Responsible Eating and Living about Rethinking Food.

He’ll be appearing at the 2019 Plant-based Prevention Of Disease Annual National Conference.

 

Meet Dr. Mills in Person

Milton Mills, MD is a prolific and passionate influencer and advocate for plant-based eating for athletes and non-athletes alike and we’re so excited to have him visit the Twin Cities this December! Learn more about him on Switch4Good’s website and be sure to mark your calendars for the Cut the Cheese event on December 6 at French Meadow!

Meet the Vegan Thanksgiving Planning Committee!

Behind every event is a team of folks who are working to make sure every detail is set––and we’re so grateful for year’s team! Meet Henry, Rae, and Taylor, members of this year’s Vegan Thanksgiving Planning committee. We’ll let them tell you a bit about their involvement with the event and what they’re grateful for this season. If you got tickets and attend the event this Saturday, make sure to stop by and meet them!

 

Henry Patterson

When was your first CAA Vegan Thanksgiving Potluck?

This will be my first CAA Vegan Thanksgiving Potluck.

What have you focused on planning for the event?

I’ve worked on Social Media updates via Facebook primarily and have focused on how to create a successful and fun event.

What’s something you’re looking forward to about this event?

To be around a like-minded community of vegans with compassion for animals.

When you’re not volunteering with CAA, what are you doing?

Consulting and project management for manufacturers mostly. My clients are pretty broad from a steel company who makes grain bins to a caterer who prepares school lunches, meals on wheels, etc.

What’s one thing you’re grateful for this year?

Good friends and family.

 

Rae Hermeier

When was your first CAA Vegan Thanksgiving Potluck?

This is my first CAA Vegan Thanksgiving Potluck and I’m really excited to be a part of the planning.

What have you focused on planning for the event?

Since this is my first time helping to plan a CAA event, I’ve been focused on learning how past events have been run, and what has worked in the past as well as what needs improvement. I’ve enjoyed working as a team to accomplish everything that needs to get done.

What’s something you’re looking forward to about this event?

I’m really looking forward to connecting with members of our local vegan community. I’m also excited to try all of the yummy vegan foods!

When you’re not volunteering with CAA, what are you doing?

When I’m not working or volunteering with CAA, you can usually find me in the kitchen. I love cooking up creative vegan dishes and trying out new recipes! I also like to play video games in my spare time.

What’s one thing you’re grateful for this year?

I am extremely grateful to be a part of our local vegan community. It reminds me that I am not alone, and makes me feel empowered to help the animals in any way that I can. I’m also incredibly grateful for my boyfriend, who is always supportive of my vegan lifestyle.

 

Taylor Borgman

When was your first CAA Vegan Thanksgiving Potluck?

This will be my first one and I’m so excited!

What have you focused on planning for the event?

I have been gathering the supplies for the event, and I’ve been putting together a music playlist for the event.

What’s something you’re looking forward to about this event?

Seeing everyone together and enjoying the different foods and each other’s company!

When you’re not volunteering with CAA, what are you doing?

I am currently a student at the University of Minnesota so most of my time is spent studying for midterms, but in my free time, I like to explore the great outdoors and spend quality time with my dogs, friends, and family.

What’s one thing you’re grateful for this year?

I am most grateful for my close friends and family. They support me in everything I do (including my volunteer work with CAA and choice to be vegan) and push me out of my comfort zone. They also serve as wonderful role models and I’m thankful to have them in my life.

 

Although tickets to the event are sold out, we’ve got a couple of open volunteer spots open for this year’s 16th Annual Vegan Thanksgiving Potluck this Saturday! Bring a dish to share and have fun at the event! Sign up to volunteer here.

Dotsie Bausch is coming to the Twin Cities!

Dotsie Bausch is coming to the Twin Cities this December! For those who don’t know about Dotsie, we put together a little introduction for you.

 

A professional cyclist

She originally took up cycling while she was on a healing journey from an eating disorder and a drug habit, leading to her love for cycling.

Dotsie had a long and prolific professional cycling career, winning a medal at the 2012 London Olympic Games, eight US national championships, two Pan American gold medals, and setting a world record.

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Thank you for your support on Give to the Max Day!

Thanks to you, we surpassed our original $6,000 goal as well as our $10,000 stretch goal and raised $10,340 for the animals on Thursday!

Your gift supports our work of creating lasting change for farmed animals through sharing their stories and how plant-based eating helps them on social media, e-newsletters, and direct outreach done year-round by our volunteers through our programs and events, including Twin Cities Veg Fest.  

Your gift will go toward supporting creating lasting change for the animals through:

  • Our Wholesome Minnesota program, which focuses on increasing the availability of plant-based food in institutions
  • Launching a mentor program that will provide one-on-one diet change support for individuals
  • Training volunteers who will continue to expand our educational video outreach and leafleting programs
  • Bringing over 10,000 people to Twin Cities Veg Fest 2019!

Thank you for your generosity and support in creating lasting change for individuals and institutions in our communities.

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Upcoming Events

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Vegan Recipe Club at East Lake Library

Tuesday, February 18, 2020

Vegan Recipe Club at East Lake Library

Tuesday, March 17, 2020

Vegan Recipe Club at East Lake Library

Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Vegan Recipe Club at East Lake Library